Bringing the dinghy aboard

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Double Horizon
Posts: 440
Joined: Wed 09 May 07, 0:18
Your Country: USA

Bringing the dinghy aboard

Post by Double Horizon »

I have tried several methods of bringing the dinghy aboard, all use the spinnaker halyard.

1) use a 3-point harness to hoist at the side of the boat, while one person operates the winch and the other holds the dinghy out from the ama hull, and guides it over to the net. Then invert it and tie down.
2) release the bow stay, use a 3-point harness to hoist at the front of the fore cross-beam, while one person operates the winch and the other holds the dinghy out from the center hull and guides it over the beam to the net. Then invert it and tie down.
3) release the bow stay, lift the dinghy vertically from it's bow attachment, to hoist at the front of the fore cross-beam, while one person operates the winch and the other holds the dinghy out from the crossbeam and center hull and guides it over the beam to the net. Then invert it and tie down.
4) from the side of the boat, lift the dinghy vertically from it's bow attachment, allowing it's bottom to slide against the ama's vinyl rub rail, and guide it over the ama to the net. Then invert it and tie down.

I find method #4 to be the easiest for the person guiding the dinghy, and least risk to rubbing the finish of the hulls. It can also be done single-handed if the wind isn't too strong, by alternating positions and winching up/down in steps while the stern of the dinghy is repositioned.

Any of these work better with the dinghy motor removed, and I always do that. The motor MUST be removed if you lift the dinghy from its bow. I use a Forespar Motor Mate lift to bring the motor onto the aft rail.

I'd like to know if others have better ideas about the methods they have tried.
Last edited by Double Horizon on Fri 16 Aug 13, 18:38, edited 3 times in total.
Larry - Former Owner DF-1200
gminkovsky
Posts: 211
Joined: Wed 01 Nov 06, 19:58
Your Country: USA, Long Island Sound

Post by gminkovsky »

I use a 3-point harness on the dinghy. Between the harness and spinnaker halyard there is a 5:1 block and tackle with cam cleat.

I adjust the block and tackle to the longest position and pull the halyard tight. Then from the side of the ama, I lean out to push on the halyard/tackle with one hand to keep the dinghy away from the hull and with the other hand I pull the tail through the cam cleat so the dinghy is level with the ama. Then I guide the dinghy onto trampoline.

I do this single handed. My dinghy is Walker Bay 10 with inflatable tubes - all-up weight about 140 pounds.

It would be easier with 7:1 tackle... i only take this dinghy on long cruises.
TC
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri 31 Dec 10, 20:26
Your Country: USA, Sedro-Woolley

Dinghy...

Post by TC »

After a search, picking this forum's brains and attempting to use an inflatable kayak, I found a older, hard sided, 9'6"Gig Harbor Boatworks sailing dinghy. Displacement hull, a bit tippy, but rows great (7ft wood oars) and can get out on it and sail around while in a port. Oars and boom are stowed with bungees to the inside of the boat. Mast is stowed against Strider's spreaders.

Usually, when in transit, the dinghy rests upside down on the net, bow aft on the net cable. As a displacement hull, it has too much drag to tow it...went from 6 to 3kts experimenting.

The dinghy only weighs 60lb and is pretty easy to move. I pull the boat onto the net via the 12ft bow line, over the ama. The bow line then run under the midships seat. From the opposite side, I step on the gunwale and easily pull the now midship line to raise the boat vertically on its side. I can then walk the dinghy into a good position for turning upside down. The boat is secured by running the bow line, still under the midship seat to a loop on the dinghy stern and then to one of the lifting eyes on the forward ama.

For short term storage needing to fold the ama, once the dinghy is vertical on its side, I walk it onto the catwalk and lean it against the cabin. It is secured using the same midship line to the handhold on the cabin top.

Long term storage. Three point harness and use the spinnaker halyard to lift the dinghy to Strider's bow. It is stowed bow forward on a mahogany board suspended on the bow rails. The stern is on a second mahogany board just forward of the mast, resting on the hand rails and the deck. In this position, the dinghy covers the forward hatches and the anchor locker. Still, the hatches can be opened. Need to lift the bow to get into the anchor locker. Shipping straps hold the dinghy in place.

Strider sails nicely with the dinghy on the bow. There is a slight tendency for one of the genoa sheets to get hung up, but not too difficult.
TC

Formerly of:
Strider
DF 1000 #17
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